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What is Google “Pay Per Clip” advertising?

pay per clip advertisingGoogle Pay Per Click or Google Pay Per Clip?

I regularly look at Google Webmaster Tools; (AKA Search Console) a free tool available to anyone who has a website. It tells you all sorts of important and interesting things about how Google is treating your website and its general performance through various metrics.

Now look at the image above, it is a search I put into Google when Webmaster Tools indicated this Blog was on the first page for the search term.

So why am I interested in that? Why would I be bothered about it? We don’t sell Pay Per Clip advertising, at least not yet!

The point is my actual placement on the page and the search result that Google provided:

pay per click advertising

You will note that the “pay per clip” phrase is written on the Title description of the page. Google displays this is in it’s search result listings. That is why Google thinks “paper clip” is a relevant result. You can see it is shown in bold as it is part of the search phrase itself.

And to cut a long story short, this is why I am sharing it with you;

Think about your website pages and their Titles, Google reads them. Google does not read your meta keywords by the way. It concentrates on your content and page titles amongst many other things.

If you are in the market for some pay per click (Adwords) advertising help, then give us a shout, we are Google qualified after all.

To be fair we haven’t yet created the advertising model for “pay per clips”.

However, could this work?…

pay per clip advertising maybe

 

Actually I quite like that! 😀

The most expensive PPC keywords in Adwords

most expensive adwordsmost expensive adwordsThe image above shows you where Adwords PPC advertising is placed on a Google search result page.

Showing off here: On the search term “Search Engine Promotion” we are also on the first page – without paying Google. A “natural” or “organic” listing.;

most expensive Google Adwords phrases

and you can then see the other Adverts on the bottom of the page. Again paid for.

I had a thought tonight. I would look at some old posts and website pages that we have created over the years and see how they are doing in search. Some of these pages are years old.

Here is an extract:

Pay Per Click – What is it?

This is the process by which advertisements are shown in a search engine’s results and then paid for for every click, on a basis of how many times they are clicked; hence the name.

Google’s version of this form of advertising is called Google Adwords and is likely to provide your company with the most exposure due to its domination of the search engine market.

Adwords is a very measurable method of advertising your website so it will be easy for you to track your progress and indeed, control your spend.

Google Adwords appear at the top and bottom of the search results, as shown below.

most expensive keywords ppc

most expensive keywords ppc

most expensive keywords ppc

Google Adwords – how does it work?

You create an advertisement in the Adwords control panel and then decide how much you will bid for that advert to appear.

To get started you will need to create a Google account which is straightforward.

You then set up a campaign in Adwords and decide your daily budget that you are prepared to spend bringing visitors to your website.

 

How much is too much to pay?

We came across these phrases that seemed rather a lot of money was being spent on – PER CLICK!

  • Online live roulette – £75.02
  • TAC compensation – £70.19
  • No win no fee accident compensation – £66.75
  • Discounting accounts receivable – £64.90

Extract ends.

I wanted to update that information with the latest prices I can find.

I thought I’d start with money – it used to be very expensive:

  • mortgage – £11.07
  • loans – £13.09

Remember – these are PER CLICK, so each click on your advert will allow Google to charge you that sum of money – each time.

Then I thought “what about gambling?” So…

  • roulette – £29.00
  • online gambling – £171.69

Then the most I have ever seen:

  • Live blackjack – £318.02!

This is scary stuff. Therefore I wanted to be number 1 for 1 week for all the words above, I would have to pay them £64,479.35. In one week!

To put your mind at rest and indeed in the real world however we have recently been managing a campaign on behalf of a client that who sells shoes online and they have been charged on average 32p per click.

So the moral of the story. If you are going to spend literally hundreds per click on Google Adwords, you’d better me making a massive profit and converting 100% of your website visitors !

If you want to read more about this subject go to this page: https://www.clickingmad.com/promote/online-advertising-platforms/google-adwords. There are more links in the right hand column to other relevant information.

 

Some Google Adwords Myths.

I note some useful information released today by Google they wanted to put matters straight. I thought you might find it interesting.

“There’s lots of misinformation floating around the web about the way AdWords works, and our AdWords support teams get to hear most of it. Since many of the same issues seem to keep popping up again and again, we thought we’d run a blog series to help you separate the myths from the facts. We’ve tried to capture the most persistent of them here, but remember, if you ever have any AdWords questions, you can always pop over to the AdWords Help Center or AdWords Help Forum for an answer.

Myth # 1: Spending money on Google AdWords will influence my website’s ranking in Google’s free search results.

Fact: Google AdWords and Google’s free search results are entirely independent of one another. Spending money on AdWords won’t impact your ranking in Google’s free search results. Similarly, cancelling your AdWords account won’t lead to your website being banned from Google’s search results. If you’d like to learn more about what does go into ranking your website in Google search results, check out Google Webmaster Central.

Myth # 2: Google AdWords has declined my credit card.

Fact: Google itself doesn’t actually decline credit cards. The decline usually takes place at your bank, your card-issuing institution, or its payment processor.

If your credit card gets declined, your first step should be to check and make sure you’ve filled out the Billing Preferences page correctly. Some common mistakes include:
Missing or invalid credit card number or security code
Missing or invalid expiration date
Missing or invalid billing address and/or telephone number
Once you’ve gotten that squared away, make sure that there aren’t any problems with your card itself. Be on the lookout for issues with your:
Credit limit
Maximum amount per debit
Number of possible debits within a certain period
If any of these are too low for your AdWords account, contact your bank or card-issuing institution. You should also be sure that your card allows for online debits and automatic debits.

Myth # 3: Your conversion rate can impact your quality score

Fact: The conversion rate of your ads does not affect your quality score. Some advertisers using AdWords conversion tracking mistakenly believe that they should set an easy conversion event on their landing pages to artificially boost their conversion rates. In reality, this won’t have any effect on their quality score and will simply make it harder to measure the true value of their AdWords investment.

Myth # 4: The AdWords keyword tool suggests keywords to use

Fact: The keyword tool doesn’t make any kind of recommendations about which keywords you should be using. The keyword tool just analyzes related queries that might be of benefit to you and displays them. It’s up to you to decide which keywords you want to include in your account.

You should always assess the tool’s results in the context of your advertising goals. When you do so, the keyword tool can be a helpful way of finding new, meaningful keywords, including potentially profitable ones you aren’t currently using and those that you might have excluded as negative keywords in order to protect your click-through-rate.

Myth # 5: Upper and lower case letters in AdWords keywords matter

Fact: The AdWords system doesn’t distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters.
“NYC” is the same as “nyc”
“Android Phone” is the same as “android phone”
For the sake of simplicity, we recommend that you enter all of your keywords as lowercase letters.”

This is an excerpt from Google itself who is generally pretty open about the various systems that run it’s operation.

There is more on Google own Adwords blog. Click on this link: